What Do People With Anorexia Eat?

Over a year ago I wrote a post about how people with eating disorders were misrepresented in the media via their use of skeletal pictures when interviewing or discussing someone with the disorders, yet lately I have noticed there is another stereotypical image being promoted that drives me equally round the bend, that being the idea that people with anorexia do not eat anything at all, and it is this myth I really want to tackle in this post as it is simply not true and is unhelpful to everyone.

You see when you come across articles in the paper interviewing someone with an eating disorder, they always make it sound as if the person has gone years without ever letting a morsel of food pass their lips. 

I am often reading pieces stating that someone lived on half a cornflake for three years or something ridiculous, a statement that is physically impossible and that must be taken with a pinch of salt as everyone knows journalists will often exaggerate or make things sound worse by picking and choosing details from an interview to make a good story. If an article makes it sounds like someone interviewed supposedly hasn’t eaten more than half a cornflake for three years, it is most definitely false and cannot be taken as a fact in general or by which other sufferers can be measured. 

Admittedly, people with anorexia frequently do not eat enough, it is after all one of the symptoms, the classic restricting of calories to lose or prevent weight gain. Indeed people with anorexia often eat very little, nowhere near as much as they need to keep themselves alive, but that still doesn’t mean they don’t eat anything at all and spend years living on air. In addition to those in relapse  who still eat at least something (regardless as to whether it be enough or not), when people are in recovery and on a weight gain meal plan they may actually eat more than some “normal” people. I know I have certainly followed meal plans that exceed the “government guidelines” irrelevant calorie limit, which have been prescribed to me both in and out of hospital. People in relapse and recovery are still considered as having “anorexia” if their mental state dictates that diagnosis, no matter how much they eat, and they should all be counted and taken seriously as a voice for people with eating disorders without being discriminated against for (brace yourselves)…having breakfast. What about the people who have severe anorexia but eat to keep their families off their back or to maintain a job? The ones who eat purely to stay out of hospital or the ones who are trying their best to eat to get better yet are still in as much mental pain as anyone else and hating every second? The ones who want to scream and shout every time they eat but force themselves on anyway because they don’t want their kids to see them worrying about food in fear that they may also pick up on the anxiety? That image, of people with anorexia eating, is never represented in the media, as equally valid or not it isn’t a dramatic image that would sell a story in a magazine. After all, headlines of “anorexic eats an appropriate number of calories, not because they are better but because they don’t want to scare the children” are never going to sell or create as much drama as “anorexic eats nothing and only licks a blade of grass once a month for 10 years”.

I am pretty sure that every member of my family is aware that I have anorexia and in a way I find this helpful. With them knowing, it means I don’t have to lie all the time, if I disappear for a few months to go into hospital it isn’t a big secret and I don’t have to pretend I have been off travelling, climbing Kilimanjaro or building schools for orphaned penguins in the Arctic, but in a way it actually makes things harder because I feel there is an expectation of the way I should behave at family gatherings. I am currently unable to eat outside of my house or with family anyway, but even if I were able to I would find attempting it incredibly intimidating as I imagine if I were to eat anything, people would be confused. If a person without an eating disorder goes out for a meal and eats, nobody raises an eyebrow, but if someone who is known to have an eating disorder goes out for a meal, when they eat people start to question whether there is anything actually wrong with that person in the first place. If you hear someone has to go into hospital for a new leg and then you see them prior to admission dancing the tango pretty happily using their old one, you might wonder why on earth the new leg is needed as clearly there is no problem. The issue is of course that though someone may appear to be eating happily on the surface, they could still be going through mental torture inside and may be just trying not to make a fuss and embarrass themselves or draw attention.

The dangers of this misconception that “anorexics don’t eat” are very similar to the ones created by the idea that people with anorexia are underweight. Again, family members or professionals may not be concerned about someone they suspected may have an eating disorder because the person often sits down for a family meal. Sufferers also might find themselves in situations where they don’t eat, not because of their disorder in particular, but because they feel they can’t incase people suspect that they are faking the whole thing. Much like images of skeletal bodies, people hearing the myth that people with anorexia don’t eat can cause people to think that they are not “that bad”, “not ill enough to warrant help” or even worse it can trigger them to restrict their intake further because they think there is some “anorexic standard” they have to live up to. You cannot compare the severity of a person’s illness with that of someone else’s just by looking at what they look like or how much they eat without having any idea of what is going on inside their heads. 

Overall I guess the message of this post is that when it comes to the portrayal of people with eating disorders in the media, take all the pictures and interviews as pieces of journalism to sell a paper with the nuggets of truth inside partially skewed or not representative of eating disorder patients as a whole. Making judgements based on accounts that are for the purpose of selling papers rather than truly giving a voice to people with no ulterior motive is never going to provide an unbiased piece that one can make conclusions from. Basically what I want to say is do not trust the media at all, instead you should trust strangers on the internet like me…actually don’t trust strangers on the internet…that isn’t the message I want to promote at all…. just don’t think that people with anorexia don’t eat. 

Take care everyone x

Sandwich

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7 thoughts on “What Do People With Anorexia Eat?

  1. I remember back in my anorexic days, it was really hard for me to eat with other people and I’d rarely eat at work (even though they had free food that everyone loved). I’d sometimes ‘go to lunch’ with someone only to get nothing but a drink or a tiny bit of food. People always made comments when they saw me getting food. “Oh my god, you’re eating!” It was really, really annoying. I felt like saying, “Yeah, because I am a human and I do require food at times.” It made it harder to get food on days I’d go down the the cafes because I didn’t want to hear any comments. It was almost easier to just not getting anything. That’s what I was used to, anyway. So, I think I get what you’re saying.

    People need to care less about what other people are eating and not make comments. Ever. We humans are too nosy!

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  2. Omg finally someone who talked about this! I get so angry when media portraits anorexic people like these mythical creatures that don’t eat anything and still manage to be alive.
    This problem is very strong here in Portugal. Even doctors and people with EDs think like this! I remember when I went to my weekly appointment in the hospital and I was in the waiting room, waiting my turn while eating a sandwich and the girl sitting next to me looked me in the eyes and asked: “Wait, you eat?”. I was like “don’t you?”.
    At the time I was really upset but now when I think about it I just laugh!
    Thank you so much for another amazing post!
    Kisses from Portugal ❤

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  3. Well written, and much needed. People do not understand anorexia as an anxiety disorder, because it’s easier and probably more exciting to view it as “ethereal model” disorder.
    Also, a random thought I have had a couple of times reading your blog, and this post being about anorexia again made me think it again: have you ever thought about autism? Women with autism have a high chance of eating disorders, and can have a lot of anxiety in general, they often get mis-diagnosed with BPD too. Of course I do not know you, and I could be projecting (I am trying to be assessed myself, for different reasons), but I felt I needed to suggest it to you, as it could be important. Best wishes and glad to see you still hanging in here with the blogging, it’s always a good read. xxx

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    • Interestingly I never thought about autism or knew it had any link to people with mental health problems! Thank you for bringing this to my attention, I will definitely be speaking to the professionals about it! Thank you for offering insight to me, you are very helpful, hope you are ok and know I am here xxxxx

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